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Combination Fertilizers

Mix your own: Mixing your own combination of N, P and K is the most economical way to use organic fertilizer, as well as the best way to meet specific conditions in the garden. Don’t worry about getting the formula just right; it’s not so important with organics, since (with the exception of blood meal) you're not likely to hurt your plants or your soil by using too much.

Recipes: Mix these together thoroughly. You can keep the mix uncovered, the rock powders make the soybean meal unappetizing to the animals who would like the soybean meal by itself. However nitrogen does evaporate, so don't keep much uncovered for long.

  1. All-purpose mix
    • 1/2 cup soybean meal
    • 1 cup tan rock phosphate
    • 2 cups greensand
    • use this much twice a year on an area 5 feet square (for example a border one foot deep and five feet long).
  2. Fall mix for established lawns
    • 3 cups blood meal
    • 6 cups tan rock phosphate
    • 3 cups greensand
    • use this much on 100 square feet
  3. Spring mix for established lawns
    • 1 cup blood meal
    • 6 cups tan rock phosphate
    • 3 cups greensand
    • use this much on 100 square feet
  4. New lawn mix (fall is best)
    • 4 cups blood meal
    • 13 cups tan rock phosphate
    • 6 cups greensand
    • use this much on 100 square feet

These are my best attempts to digest the conflicting advice I have found in many sources. They are not guaranteed. If you have experience with other recipes, I would be interested to hear about them.

Commercial Products: If you don’t want to bother making your own, there are premixed organic formulas available in several brand names; the most common are probably Espoma and North Country Organics.